Adjustments, Sewing

The miracle of the perfect fit the first time!

Christine Haynes of City Stitching has just released her latest pattern, the Varda top and dress. It's a nice blend between shift and sheath with classic french darts giving it some gentle shaping.

I'm a long time fan of Christine's Emery Dress pattern, I have *goes to count*, uh-hem, 34 of them 🙊😳🙈, ok, so that's a lot…

When I saw the technical drawings for this new pattern I was very interested – I've got a top pattern with french darts in it that I hacked down from a dress that I make and wear all the time, so I knew I liked the shape, and I liked the option of sleeveless if I wanted to go that way. I've made up View B for now, and will probably try out A and C at some point soon.

I'm right at the very top end of the size range in this pattern, as in my high bust measurement is the same as the bust measurement for the largest size of the pattern, so I knew I'd need to do a significant full bust adjustment right off.

Because I also usually need to grade up the hips of most patterns, I do that by just using the added width from the full bust adjustment all the way down to the hem line. Only very rarely do I need to grade up any further (I think I've only had that happen once out of all the patterns I've adjusted), and I never have to grade the waist down at all…

I did some research into dart rotations before I started the full bust adjustment. I'd never tried it before and I wanted to do something about reducing some of that I knew was going to become an enormous french dart once I'd added the 2.5 inch full bust adjustment!! But… I also didn't want to detract from the clean and simple lines of the garment by adding shoulder pleats or a traditional bust dart…

I settled on rotating an inch from the french dart up to the armscye, and while an inch doesn't sound like much when you just added a 2.5 FBA and made the french dart so big you could probably have driven a truck through, it did the trick!

There was some serious stick tape and guesstimating voodoo going on to work out exactly where I was going where to draft that armscye dart! But when I taped the paper together to close the dart and tried it 'on' it seemed to have worked, so I proceeded to cut out my muslin and get on with it!


Look at that fit!! The print of the fabric means you can't really even see the darts, but believe me, they're there.

I made the pattern up exactly according to the instructions until I got to inserting the zipper, and I even got as far as pinning one side of the invisible zip in before I remembered that sometimes apple-shaped people like me can get away without centre back zips in some styles.

I'll be honest, this has never been the case for me before, and I was highly sceptical that it would work this time, but I figured that it was worth a shot – if I could make these tops without needing to use expensive invisible zips, I was all for it. So I pinned the back seam allowance closed, half pinned in zipper and all, and tried the shirt on, miracle of miracles it fit! And it was looking good!! I removed that half pinned invisible zip quick smart and stitched the back seam closed.

The back darts meant no need for any swayback adjustment on this pattern – hurray!

I've since made another one in a solid colour (finally something to wear with the skirts!). You can see the darts on this plainer version, but I think you'll agree that the added armscye dart doesn't detract from the original design style of the shirt, and I think it certainly helps with the fit!!

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